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Tetyana here. I run the Science of Eating Disorders blog. This is the SEDs-associated Tumblr. I post about ED research, (mental) health, psychiatry, and medicine. I reblog pretty art/photography. I try to promote critical thinking. I'm known to rant about stuff. Content is not always on topic and may be triggering.
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Revisiting poor insight into illness in anorexia nervosa: true unawareness or conscious disagreement?

ohanniepo:

scienceofeds:

To investigate and validate a novel approach to distinguishing between two possible sources of poor insight in anorexia nervosa: true unawareness, in which a patient is not aware that other people think there is a problem, and disagreement, in which a patient does recognize that others think there is a problem.

[…]

About 57% of the overall level of poor insight was explained by disagreement. Prediction of treatment acceptance was significantly improved when poor insight was broken down into true unawareness and disagreement.

These data suggest that impaired insight in anorexia nervosa is an additive outcome of true unawareness and disagreement.

(Source)

Me today: “I don’t mean this like I think you’re not using good judgment…but I just really don’t think I need to be inpatient.”

My therapist: “Oh you definitely do. And if anyone else evaluated you they would say the same thing.”

(And as I’m typing this I’m thinking “No but like, I really don’t need to be inpatient. She thinks I’m much more unwell than I actually am.”

I think we are all like that to some extent. Me, at a low BMI, b/p’ing like it was my day job: Naaaah, I’m fiiiine. I feel like shit but I’m still getting A’s in my classes, so it is alll good. I am not passing out or anything. 

Revisiting poor insight into illness in anorexia nervosa: true unawareness or conscious disagreement?

To investigate and validate a novel approach to distinguishing between two possible sources of poor insight in anorexia nervosa: true unawareness, in which a patient is not aware that other people think there is a problem, and disagreement, in which a patient does recognize that others think there is a problem.

[…]

About 57% of the overall level of poor insight was explained by disagreement. Prediction of treatment acceptance was significantly improved when poor insight was broken down into true unawareness and disagreement.

These data suggest that impaired insight in anorexia nervosa is an additive outcome of true unawareness and disagreement.

(Source)

Differential caloric intake in overweight females with and without binge eating: Effects of a laboratory-based emotion-regulation training.

Neuropsychological function in patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa

This study explored the neuropsychological performance of patients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) compared with healthy controls (HCs). An additional aim was to investigate the effect of several possible mediators on the association between eating disorders (EDs) and cognitive function.

Method

Forty patients with AN, 39 patients with BN, and 40 HCs who were comparable in age and education were consecutively recruited to complete a standardized neuropsychological test battery covering the following cognitive domains: verbal learning and memory, visual learning and memory, speed of information processing, visuospatial ability, working memory, executive function, verbal fluency, attention/vigilance, and motor function.

Results

The AN group scored significantly below the HCs on eight of the nine measured cognitive domains.

The BN group also showed inferior performance on six cognitive domains.

After adjusting for possible mediators, the nadir body mass index (lowest lifetime BMI) and depressive symptoms explained all findings in the BN group. Although this adjustment reduced the difference between the AN and HC groups, the AN group still performed worse than the HCs regarding verbal learning and memory, visual learning and memory, visuospatial ability, working memory, and executive functioning.

Discussion

Patients with EDs scored below the HCs on several cognitive function measures, this difference being most pronounced for the AN group. The nadir BMI and depressive symptoms had strong mediating effects.

Longitudinal studies are needed to identify the importance of weight restoration and treatment of depressive symptoms in the prevention of a possible cognitive decline

(Source)

❝ Significant differences between normal-weight, overweight and obese patients were found for five of eight self-image variables, for all eating disorder examination questionnaire subscales and for most key diagnostic symptoms. However, effect sizes were mostly small or very small. Overweight or obese patients did not display greater levels of psychiatric psychopathology than normal-weight patients. They did, however, show a tendency towards more negative self-image and more severe ED symptoms than normal-weight patients.

— Eating disorder symptoms, psychiatric correlates and self-image in normal, overweight and obese eating disorder patients.